Archive for April, 2016

An Education in Noble Thoughts

In C. S. Lewis’s That Hideous Strength Mark Studdock, a sociologist recruited by an elite circle of progressive thinkers to advance their utopian agenda, has advanced degrees and impressive credentials but suffers from the defect of a modern education. Lewis explains, “It must be remembered that in Mark’s mind hardly one rag of noble thought, either Christian or Pagan, had a secure lodging. His education had been neither scientific nor classical—merely ‘Modern.’” In other...

The Personalist and Sacramental Meaning of “Paying the Debt”

Certain moral virtues regulate activities internal to the agent, such as his own passions and the motions that are bound up with them (e.g., temperance and fortitude, dealing with how much I should eat, or how much I should get angry). But the moral virtue of justice perfects the agent’s rectitude in his dealings with others: our acts towards another are right...

Fear of Science

Science can be inconvenient, even troubling, to those who prefer living by mythology. We find an example of this in the reaction of the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) over a thirty second commercial that showed a mother getting an ultrasound at nine months. In the commercial, the OB/GYN tells the mother that the baby is due any day.  Meanwhile, the expectant father is waving a single nacho cheese Dorito over the...

The Cosmic and Eucharistic Meaning of Openness to Life, Part II

The Incarnation expresses an infinitely fertile virginity. The Virgin Mother is herself the pure image of the Incarnation in this respect: she who “never knew man” is the mother of Him who is Man in fullness. As virgin, she images the utterly simple divinity of her Son, who, as God, is “unmixed” with creation, infinitely superior to it; as mother, she images the total self-giving...

When Justice is a “Sham”

It looks all so official, proper, formal, and stately. A complex issue goes before The Supreme Court. Wise men are asked to use their formal education, knowledge of the law, and their wide human experience to determine the justice or injustice of an important matter. No one would ever presume that a court of law in a free country shaped by Christian civilization would legalize the killing of innocent children—an unprecedented law that no...

The Cosmic and Eucharistic Meaning of Openness to Life, Part I

Adam spoke “up” when he spoke with God, and “down” in the naming of the animals, but it was not until the creation of Eve, “bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh” (Gen 2:23), that he had a dialogue with an equal. Adam and Eve had no proper names of their own before they met each other (cf. Gen 3:20). The animals were altogether other; he was himself; but Eve was, in...

Reading with the Heart of the Church: Contents of Amoris Laetitia

By Stephanie Pacheco

This is the second of two reflections on the Holy Father’s recent exhortation. Read the first here.

Having discussed some of the tone and controversy, what does Pope Francis’s apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia actually contain? The much hyped question is that of Communion for the divorced and civilly remarried. And the answer isn’t the clear “yes,” that many media releases want it to be. This question is honestly a footnote to the...

Amoris Laetitia: Pope Francis’s The Joy of Love

By Stephanie Pacheco

Amoris Laetitia is turning heads. The commentary in the short few days since its release on the morning of Friday, April 8, has been eruptive. Slate Magazine, admittedly not the classiest publication, called Amoris Laetitia a “closeted argument for gay marriage,” an accusation which is almost-hilariously uninformed. Meanwhile the traditionalist blog Rorate Caeli takes issue with the whole exhortation, calling it a “turning point,” as in something not continuous with Catholic teaching.

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